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18-Apr-2014 3:46am PDT  

 

Fort Lauderdale International Film Festival

29 Annual November 07, 2014 to November 23, 2014

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International
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1314 E Las Olas Blvd
#007
Fort Lauderdale FL 33301-2334
USA
Phone: 954-760-9898 x 101
Fax: 954-760-9099
info@fliff.com
http://www.FLIFF.com

OPEN CALL FOR ENTRIES • Select a Category of Entry to continue.

Full Length Feature, Professional Competition
Feature length films that have not played in South Florida.
Documentary, Professional Competition
Professional documentaries that have not played in South Florida.
Short Subject, Professional Competition
Professional short films that have not played in South Florida.
Short Narrative, International Collegiate Competition (under 20 min)
Short films under 20 minutes made by University or College student from any country.

YOU MUST PROVIDE THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION WITH YOUR WITHOUTABOX ONLINE SUBMISSION:
-Student status
-Name of school
-School contact
Long Narrative, International Collegiate Competition (20 min - 60 min.)
Short films 20 minutes and over made by College or University student from any country.

YOU MUST PROVIDE THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION WITH YOUR WITHOUTABOX ONLINE SUBMISSION:
-Student status
-Name of school
-School contact
Documentary, International Collegiate Competition
Documentary film made by University or College student from any country.

YOU MUST PLEASE PROVIDE THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION WITH YOUR WITHOUTABOX ONLINE SUBMISSION:
-Student status
-Name of school
-School contact
Animation, International Collegiate Competition
Animation film made by a university or college student from any country.

YOU MUST PROVIDE THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION WITH YOUR WITHOUTABOX ONLINE SUBMISSION:
-Student status
-Name of school
-School contact
International High School Competition
Film or video made by high school students from any country.
Entries should be no longer than 10 minutes, however, we will accept some exceptions.

MISSION & OBJECTIVE
To promote the creation and appreciation of cinematic art in South Florida. To cultivate and nurture the Florida film artist through educational initiatives and exhibition of films. To impact on the state and local economy through promotional efforts in highlighting South Florida as an exhibition venue for premieres.

Goals
1) To showcase the best independent, domestic and international films to the residents and visitors of Broward County
2) To provide educational opportunities and recognition assisting in the development of Florida students and emerging filmmakers.
3) To promote Broward County screening and filming opportunities to the film industry.

Objectives
1) To remain on the cutting edge of film festivals through innovative and creative programming.
2) To present a series of free film related seminars which engage, enlighten and inform the participants as well as the audience.
3) To annually produce a International Student Film Competition, so as to nurture and develop the student filmmaker from around the world. Furthermore, to promote professional cinematographers and videographers in the state through THE BEST OF FLORIDA-MADE IN FLORIDA.
4) To provide programming that relates to Florida social, cultural and artistic issues such as our Florida treasures program.
5) To provide programming to our senior citizens which enables them to enjoy our events at no cost.
6) To provide an outreach program bringing cinema to those who would not otherwise be able to experience our events.
7) To cultivate and develop the audience of tomorrow through the Children's Film Festival and Arts In Education program.
8) To bring to Broward County the best new talents in filmmaking from around the world.
9) To honor outstanding contributions to the industry through a series of Tributes.
10) To interface with the Broward Film Commission so as to provide the greatest assistance possible to potential Broward film and video productions.


ABOUT THE FESTIVAL
Celebrating its 29th annual festival in 2014, the Fort Lauderdale International Film Festival (FLIFF) is a non-profit cultural institution presents American indies and studio films, international films,special tributes and seminars and introduces industry leaders to South Florida audiences. The fall festival runs October-November, and annually screens foreign and independent films in Fort Lauderdale, Weston, Pompano Beach, Sunrise, Hollywood, St Augustine, Amelia Island, Jacksonville, Tallahassee, Daytona Beach and The Bahamas. Considered one of the most important regional film festivals in the U.S., the Festival's commitment to first-time filmmakers and innovative programming make it the perfect test market for filmmakers.

FLIFF offers a vast array of works by some of today's most promising independent and foreign filmmakers. The Festival showcases over 200 films from around the world and is considered one of the most important regional festivals in the U.S. A remarkable diversity of local, national and international films have screened to enthusiastic audiences. FLIFF unites industry leaders, filmmakers, journalists, students and film lovers during cutting-edge seminars, celebrity tributes and special event premieres.

Filmmakers submitting to FLIFF listing the option of being considered for the FLIFF On Location program in St. Augustine, Tallahassee, Daytona Beach and the Bahamas. You will be able to make your selection at the time of submission.

Films can be submitted in the following formats: BluRay, DVD or on-line. Exhibition formats include: DCP, BluRay, DVD, HDCam, and files.

HISTORY

The Broward County Film Society, dba The Greater Fort Lauderdale Film Festival, was founded on June 3, 1986 to introduce independent cinema to a South Florida audience base of more than four and a half million people.

During those early years (86-88) the Festival attempted to create a society event. However, the mix of off-beat American indies with even more obtuse Canadian film spoke to a more grassroots audience. Fortunately, in 1987, the State of Florida along with the Governor and the Florida Arts Council - decreed the Festival to be one of seven Vital Local Cultural Institutions of Florida, a distinction that brought an annual $100,000 grant.

The Festival named Gregory von Hausch Executive Director in 89. That year the festival also created a Florida Student Film Competition that featured cash prizes. Eastman Kodak launched its annual Educational Seminars Series. Special guests included Michael Moore and Lynn Redgrave.

The 90 Festival became a three-week event, taking place from Miami to Boca Raton. Martin Scorsese presented our Student Film Awards. Guests included Marlo Thomas and Darren McGavin.

91 launched Lifetime Achievement Awards and honored Peter Bogdanovich, Mark Rydell, Donald O'Connor, Vincent Price, Van Johnson and Burt Reynolds. Guest presenters included Prof. Richard Brown of AMC's REFLECTIONS ON A SILVER SCREEN, Charles Durning, and Patrick O'Neal. Guests included Claude Atkins, Alan Rickman, and Samuel Z. Arkoff.

The Festival has held a reception every year in Cannes since 1991, as well as a Los Angeles reception at the American Film Market. This event provides an opportunity for West Coast media to be updated on Festival dates and special events. Cannes serves the world entertainment media.

The 92 Festival welcomed honoree Audrey Hepburn, plus special guests Jennifer Beals, Alexandre Rockwell, Les Blank and Matthew Harrison. 1992 also marked our first year of screening IMAX film. Other guests that year included Elliot Gould and Edward James Olmos.

By 1993, the Film Festival had established itself and secured Blockbuster as a Presenting Sponsor. The 93 Festival's student film competition went national. Students from Yale, USC, North Carolina, NYU, UCLA, Florida State Univ. and Columbia won awards. An Art On Film documentary series was added to the program list as was an Academy Award Documentary series. Guests included Ashley Judd, Elisabeth Shue and Roger Corman received the Lifetime Achievement.

Through a year-round programming schedule, the Festival had cultivated 4,000 members. The programming had left behind its strictly North American indie persona, and that evolution was reflected in a name change to The Fort Lauderdale International Film Festival. By this time, Festival films were approximately 45% American indie and 55% foreign titles.

The 94 Festival exceeded the combined cash receipts of the 92 and 93 festivals combined. More than 35,000 people attended the event which proved to be a major coup as Tropical Storm Gordon roared in and remained through the first five days of the festival. Regardless the festival produced more sell-outs than anytime in its short nine-year history. The festival also presented six U.S. premieres and one world premiere. Festival films ended up on several top 10 lists. Special guests included Treat Williams, Shane Black (Lethal Weapon) and Martin Donovan.

The 95 Festival launched the first ever Film Festival in the Sky with Carnival AirLines (every Fort Lauderdale bound Carnival flight included a Festival film). An unprecedented Media Reception at JFK and a subsequent press conference 30,000 feet aboard a special flight to FTL made cinema history as well. Special guests included Michael Caine, Roger Moore, Dana Delany, JT Walsh, Mia Sara, Tim Reid, Jason Connery, Jon Cryer and Gregory Hines.

In 96 the Festival featured 110 films from 30 countries and drew 57,000 admissions. Guests included 100 celebrities: Tony Curtis, Gian Carlo Esposito, Noah Taylor (Shine) and Kevin Spacey.

The 97 Festival honored director Robert Wise (West Side Story, Sound of Music), Arthur Hiller, Ben Gassara, Peter Bogdanovich, Gena Rowlands, Nick Nolte, Leonard Rosenman, Amanda Plummer, Fairuza Balk and Robert Forster.

In January of 98, the Film Society was named the fifth inductee as a Broward Major Cultural Institution, s designated by the Broward Cultural Affairs Council (the other organizations are the Florida Philharmonic, the Florida Grand Opera, the Museum of Discovery and Science and the Museum of Art). That distinction also helped the Festival to secure a free, 25-year lease on the Vinnette Carroll Theatre (which the Festival dubbed Cinema Paradiso during film screenings). In July of 2000, the Cinema opened and year-round, nightly screenings commenced. The Festival welcomed new presenting sponsors Fathom Motion Pictures and Parasol Films in 2000. The Hollywood based companies are rapidly infusing the South Florida motion picture industry.

The Film Festival broke all records in 1998, with some 62,000 attendees. Special guests included John Frankenheimer, David Arquette, Christina Applegate and many others. 17 world premieres and over 120 films from 35 countries were featured in 300 screenings.

The 99 Film Festival presented seven world premieres and a dozen national premieres. Special guests included Lord Richard Attenborough, Eva Marie Saint, Tim Roth, Kelly McGillis, Tim Daly, Norman Jewison, Lukas Haas and more than 300 independent filmmakers from around the world. With nearly 66,000 attendees, this was the biggest film fest yet.

In the year 2000, the Fort Lauderdale International Film Festival was selected as just one of six film festivals in the nation to receive a major grant from the Academy of Motion Picture Arts & Sciences. The Festival opened Cinema Paradiso and after a lengthy (and on-going) renovation, began screening films. The Festival moved locations: Regal South Beach, Miami; Regal Oakwood Plaza, Hollywood; Regal Westfork, Pembroke Pines; Sunrise Cinemas, Sunrise; Regal Shadowood, Boca Raton; Galleria Cinemas and Gateway Cinemas both in Fort Lauderdale. Opening Night was once again held at Parker Playhouse. Distinguished guests included John Waters, George Sidney, Howard Keel, Peter Falk, Rob Morrow, Fred Dryer and more than 350 independent filmmakers and international journalists.

In 2001, guests included Paul Mazursky, Paul Sorvino, Jonathan Silverman. In 2002, Matt Damon, Leslie Nielsen, John Phillip Law, Steve Guttenberg, Mario Bella, George Sluizer, Alessandro D'Alatri, Silke, Masada Harada, Bob Gale. In 2003, Ben Kingsley, Jacquelene Bissett, Nestor Carbonnell, Bod Odenkirk. Shohreh Aghdasloo. In 2004, In 2005, Arthur Penn, Irene Cara, Johua Jackson, Sarah Carter, Bobby Roth, Michael Moore, Veronica Cartwright, Bill Plympton, Christian Kane. In 2007, Gary Sinise, Stephen Baldwin, Richard Kind, Dennis Farina, Mary Stuart Masterson, David Mitchell, Robert Webb, Andrew O'Connor, Eric Roberts, DB Sweeney, Davy Jones, Douglas Spain, Brendan Hines, Taryn Southern, Joe Pantolano, Vonzell Solomon. In 2008, John Ratzenberger, Jane Lynch, Brandon Routh, Eli Wallach, Anne Jackson, Richard Chamberlain, Alexie Gilmore, Bryan Callen, Corey Feldman, Matt Sevitto, Steve Sandvoss, Paul Campbell. Our special guests in 2009 were Christopher Plummer, Matthew Broderick, Michelle Monaghan and 200 indie filmmaker around the world.

In 2009 the Festival honored Kevin Mccarthy, Matthew Broderick and Michelle Monaghan.

In 2010 Festival special guests included Christopher Plummer, Claire Bloom, Edward Burns, Michael Moore (4th appearance at FLIFF), Michael Murphy, Jane Russell, Leslie Caron, Jimmy Bennett and David Keith. The Festival also launched a four day mini fest in St Augustine and began screening films on Grand Bahama Island. This partnership will bloom into a 5 day mini fest in October 2011.

In 2011, we officially launched FLIFF On-Location: Grand Bahama Island. Our filmmakers traveled overnight aboard The Bahama Celebration, each having their own cabin. Accommodations on GBI were at the beautiful Pelican Bay Resort. Our special guest was dennis Haysbert. Our Opening Night Film played outdoors at the beach with a fish fry luau taking place with the event. Back at FLIFF our special guests included Beau bridges, Penelope Ann Miller, Dennis Farina,and Piper Laurie. FLIFF added screenings in Sunrise Weston and Pompano Beach.

In 2012, we continued to do Grand Bahama, Daytona, St Augustine, Fort Lauderdale, Sunrise, Weston, and Pompano. Special guests included Carroll Baker, James Caan and Bailee Madison.

The Festival grew longer year after year. The seven-day event had grown to 11 to 13 to 15 to 17 to 21 (and in 2000, 28 days - the longest in the world, according to Guinness Book of World Records). Up from 21 films in 1989, the Festival presented over 100 in 2000; from 35 screenings, the Festival increased to some 300. From one venue, the Festival presented films in Miami, Hollywood, Fort Lauderdale and Boca Raton.

Thanks to a 29 year and ongoing relationship with industry leaders, our commitment to emerging filmmakers and the recognition of established talent has enabled the Festival to host a record number of World and National premieres and earn respect in the festival circuit.

In the past few years, FLIFF has been recognized throughout the country with our highly attended Maroone Moonlight Movies and Outdoor Film Series. In early 2002, FLIFF staff designed a high tech projection and audio system to bring huge movies to the community. Hundreds of guests attend our outdoor screenings, which are held weekly throughout the year from West Palm Beach to Key West on a huge 30' foot inflatable screen, and a superbright 8,000 lumen LCD projector. With over 300 outdoor events since 2002, FLIFF is dedicated to "Bringing the movies to you".

ORGANIZERS
Admin FLIFF (admin) ; Bonnie Adams (Senior Program Director) ; Gregory Von Hausch (President & CEO) ; Gregory von Hausch (President and CEO) ; Jan Mitchell (Publicity Director) ; Todd Blackmon (Webmaster)

GENERAL RULES
YOU MUST LABEL YOUR SCREENER & ENVELOPE WITH FILM'S CATEGORY. For example: Professional Feature (PF), Professional Short (PS), Professional Documentary (PD), Int'l Collegiate Short Narrative (SS), Int'l Collegiate Narrative (SN), Int'l Collegiate Documentary (SD), Int'l Collegiate Animation (SA), or High School Competition (HS).

We do not require a press kit to be sent with your preview. If your film is selected, we will then request materials as described under "Check List" in each category. While you need not provide ALL these items, you may refer to this list for guidance.

Your entry through withoutabox.com authorizes us to show clips on televison for marketing and/or news programs. If you receive early acceptance, all press material must be received by August 15th for professional categories only.

**NOTE TO STUDENTS** YOU MUST PROVIDE THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION WITH YOUR WITHOUTABOX ONLINE SUBMISSION:
-Student status
-Name of school & city
-School contact

We only notify of acceptance, but if at any time you want to inquire about the status of your film, please email Bonnie at bonnie@fliff.com You must indicate WAB #, which competition, which category, and title of film in order for us to help you.

TERMS AND CONDITIONS

If selected, your entry through withoutabox.com authorizes us to show clips on television for marketing and/or news programs. If a film is selected, filmmaker authorizes the film to play again if it wins an award or selected for future outreach screenings in St Augustine, Amelia Island, and Grand Bahama Island. Once a film has been selected, it cannot be pulled by the filmmaker. All material for the Professional Competition must be received by August 20. Once a film is submitted and previewed for acceptance it cannot be withdrawn. Fort Lauderdale International Film Festival is hereby granted the right to utilize an excerpt from any film submitted and accepted for exhibition at the Festival for promotional purposes. If selected, your entry authorizes us to show clips on television for marketing and/or news programs. The individual or corporation submitting the film hereby warrants that it is authorized to commit the film for screening, and understands and accepts these requirements and regulations. The undersigned shall indemnify and hold harmless Fort Lauderdale International Film Festival from and against any and all claims, liabilities, losses, damages, and expenses (including but not limited to attorney's fees, and costs of the court) which may be incurred by reason of any claim involving copyright, trademark, credits, publicity, screening, and loss of or damage to the screening videos entered.